ThingLink in the Classroom – One image. Tons of possibilities.

Heather Farmakis, Ph.D. has extensive experience in professional development, distance learning, and online instructional design in higher education, K-12 and continuing education markets. She has a PhD in Global Leadership and has researched cognitive style and online learner success throughout her career.

Want to get your message across, but do not want to cloud it with heavy text?

Move away from the drib drab of everyday lessons and get more interactive using a free web-based tool called ThingLink. ThingLink can transform the way you teach, and not only that, but the way your students learn. Enough already? You want to know how this work? ThingLink is free image platform that converts an image into a rich and interactive experience by adding music, video, text, images, and more.

The best part about ThingLink is you can jam pack everything onto one page and one image. By tagging your image with content from all over the internet  – YouTube, Flickr, Facebook, Twitter, or  linking to a PDF to further explain something…you get the idea.

An Explainer ThingLink

One of my Favorite ThingLinks

Here is a Learning Technology ThingLink

Make a ThingLink

This is super easy and free. First, visit thinglink.com. Join and the site will then begin to bring you through the basic steps of creating your very own ThingLink. It is very user friendly and intuitive to use. You can literally have an interactive image posted within minutes. Click here for more details.

Create Your Own Channel 

You can add students to your group. Here they can add images or edit images together. Wow! Imagine the possibilities? Click here for more details.

Share Your ThingLink with Us!

Share a ThingLink with us by hovering over the image you created and look for the Share icon. Tell us how you plan to use this fun and interactive tool.

 

Feature image courtesy of Flickr, pierofix.

  • Nick Grantham

    I love the collaborative aspect of ThingLink. A group of students or a class working together to create one giant interactive piece.
    Each student or group of students can focus on researching a different aspect of the image. Video, audio, or any media that adds variation and value to the project. I could also see this as a really neat curation tool, to visualize and discuss aspects of a topic.
    Great post Heather!